Tutorials tagged “multiple master”

7 articles

Working with UFO

Working with UFO

exporting importing kerning multiple master ufo

The Unified Font Object, a format for storing font data, revolutionized font production. Here is how you can integrate Glyphs into a UFO a workflow and profit from features of other apps.

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Additional Masters for Individual Glyphs: The Brace Trick

Additional Masters for Individual Glyphs: The Brace Trick

layers multiple master

Sometimes you need an extra master, but just for a glyph, not for the whole font. Here is how you do it in Glyphs 2.

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Multiple Masters, part 3: Setting up instances

Multiple Masters, part 3: Setting up instances

exporting multiple master naming

Once you have drawn a couple of letters in a Multiple Master set-up, it is a good time to determine instances. Read here how.

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Multiple Masters, part 2: Keeping your outlines compatible

Multiple Masters, part 2: Keeping your outlines compatible

editing multiple master vectors

In order to interpolate, Glyphs needs compatible drawings in all masters. Here is how to make sure your paths are ready for interpolation.

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Multiple Masters, part 1: Setting up masters

Multiple Masters, part 1: Setting up masters

multiple master

Understanding interpolation is crucial for producing a large font family. Here is how to get started.

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Alternating Glyph Shapes with Multiple Axes

Alternating Glyph Shapes with Multiple Axes

custom parameters multiple master

The Bracket Trick only works with a single axis. If you have two or more axes in your Multiple Master font, you can still have your glyphs change their shape. It’s a little trickier though.

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Alternating Glyph Shapes: The Bracket Trick

Alternating Glyph Shapes: The Bracket Trick

editing layers multiple master

Sometimes, you will need two different forms of a glyph. A common example is the vertical line in the dollar sign: in light weights, it usually cuts through the whole glyph, but in bold weights, there’s not enough room for that, so you will have to split up the line and reduce it to what extends beyond the top and the bottom of the S shaped part. Here’s a simple trick that will help you do this automatically.

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